Generative Exercise on Margaret Atwood’s “You Fit into Me”

Model Poem The model poem we’re using as an illustration of what a poem does, and how to respond to a poem, is “you fit into me,” (1971) by Margaret Atwood. The poem is very short, consisting only of four lines in two stanzas, or two couplets: you fit into melike a hook into anContinue reading “Generative Exercise on Margaret Atwood’s “You Fit into Me””

Generative Exercise: “Sasha’s Flight”

LOL – this is not a poem I’m ever going to send out, I don’t think – so I’m sharing it with you. I promised to do a generative exercise along with my poetry students based on an assignment called “Twenty Little Poetry Projects” by Jim Simmerman in The Practice of Poetry. The exercise hasContinue reading “Generative Exercise: “Sasha’s Flight””

Finding the Words 2: The “Eight Words” Poetry Generative Exercise

In FINDING THE WORDS 1: BLACKOUT/ERASURE POETRY I presented a lesson on how to get out of your word rut and discover new vocabulary through that form. In this lesson, you’ll discover new words by playing the “Eight Words Game.” The game also works as a poetry generative exercise.

Finding the Words 1: Blackout/Erasure Poetry Generative Exercises

Overview Writers default. That is, without quite realizing it, we write using preferred words, preferred sentence styles, preferred voices. This means a universe of possibilities is not occurring to us during composition. So we need ways to break out of our habits, to find new words. Here is the first of two poetry generative exercisesContinue reading “Finding the Words 1: Blackout/Erasure Poetry Generative Exercises”

A Generative Poetry Exercise from Kenneth Koch

Generative Exercises allow creative writers to think outside our normal default modes of creation. Often, the poems created during exercises are stronger than ones created with no prompt. This exercise is taken fro Chapter 7 of Rose Where Did You Get That Red?
Michael JackmanPosted inmusings, poetry lessonsTags:, , , , Leave a comment on A Generative Poetry Exercise from Kenneth Koch